Help for South Sudan

by Gerry Lynch last modified 06 Mar, 2017 04:39 PM

Bishop’s appeal to save lives after UN declares famine

Bishop Nicholas has launched a Lent appeal for one of the world’s poorest countries, where United Nations agencies have declared a famine in the last fortnight. 

The Diocese has had a relationship with South Sudan, along with neighbouring Sudan, for more than forty years with many Anglican parishes in Dorset and Wiltshire heavily involved in the link. At least 100,000 people face starvation, with a million at severe risk of famine and more than three million displaced. 

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The Salisbury appeal will raise money for Christian Aid’s work in the country. The appeal was launched at the start of the season of Lent.

Bishop Nicholas said, “South Sudan is a part of the world in which there has been relentless conflict.  After the hope of independence in July 2011, they have fallen back into violence and there is great suffering.

“Some 3.4 million women, men and children are displaced from their homes.  The economy has collapsed, malnutrition has soared and hunger has taken a firm hold.  We cannot do nothing and I am appealing to the Diocese for urgent help for our brothers and sisters. 

“In the worst affected region, at least 100,000 people are facing starvation and a further million are on the brink of famine. Many other parts of the country are at risk of following the same path over the next months, and refugees are fleeing into neighbouring countries like Uganda and Kenya. 

“I am calling on local people, whatever their faith, to support this appeal for the sake of our common humanity. What we raise will be given to Christian Aid’s crisis appeal which will support a coordinated and local response where there is greatest need. 

“People can give online at bit.ly/ssudanappeal, text “SSUD17 £10” to 70070 to donate £10 to the appeal, or make a cheque payable to Salisbury DBF SSA and send it to South Sudan Appeal, Church House, Crane Street, Salisbury, SP1 2QB.” 

Archbishop of Canterbury, the Most Revd Justin Welby visited neighbouring parts of East Africa in the past fortnight, and sent a message to Anglicans across the world, stating, “I’ve seen first-hand the consequences of the volume of refugees attempting to cross the borders to find safety, and the crisis facing those neighbouring countries as well as those in South Sudan. I’ve also been speaking with Anglican and other church leaders about the urgent need for a ceasefire in South Sudan. 

“Please join me in praying for peace, for security, for relief, and for the Holy Spirit to comfort those who need it most.”

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