The Perfect Setting for the Prayer Book

by Gerry Lynch last modified 02 Dec, 2013 12:50 PM

Prayer Book Society members mark Advent with carol service in ‘perfect village setting’.

The Perfect Setting for the Prayer Book

The Revd Mark Wood, Priest-in-Charge of Wilton with Netherhampton and Fugglestone, who conducted the service, with Barrie Waterfall, Chairman of the Salisbury Branch of the PBS.

The pretty village of Netherhampton, which lies just two miles across the watermeadows from Salisbury Cathedral, was the perfect setting on a bright winter day for the annual Advent Carol Service of the Diocese of Salisbury Branch of the Prayer Book Society.

Of all the churches in the Salisbury City area, St Catherine’s, Netherhampton, is perhaps the one whose worship is most strongly rooted in the Book of Common Prayer. It is therefore particularly appropriate that local members of the Society gathered there to listen to seasonal readings from Scripture and sing Advent hymns old and new.

Branch Chairman, Barrie Waterfall, said:

“The Advent Carol Service is one of the most popular branch events of the year, and no wonder. Netherhampton and St Catherine’s provide the perfect village setting to keep Advent properly – a period where we prepare ourselves in expectant hope for the incarnation of Christ.

“We sing the Advent hymns that sometimes get lost in the pressure to keep Christmas earlier every year. Visitors are very welcome at this or any of our events.”

The Diocese has the largest branch of the Prayer Book Society in the country. The Society exists to promote and preserve the use of the 1662 Book of Common Prayer, the traditional service book of the Church of England.

The Society works to ensure that our historic Prayer Book continues to be available to future generations, and seeks to introduce it to young people, ordinands and Parochial Church Councils. There are sister Societies in many parts of the Anglican Communion.

The Book of Common Prayer is loved for its wonderful language, dignified and memorable but always speaking to our human condition. Phrases from it have come into everyday use and have been quoted in literature. 'Till death us do part', 'read, mark, learn and inwardly digest', 'peace in our time'.

With the Authorised Version of the Bible, the Book of Common Prayer has not only been a profound influence on the English language in daily use, but shaped the language of worship both in public services and private prayers.

 

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